Regulations of the Davis Division of the Academic Senate

(Revised September 1, 2014)
    • REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGHER DEGREES
    • 500. General Requirements for Master’s Degrees
    • 501. Master of Arts or Master of Science
    • 502. Master of Education
    • 503. Master of Engineering
    • 504. Master of Fine Arts
    • 505. Master of Health Services
    • 506. Master of Arts in Teaching
    • 507. Master of Business Administration
    • 508. Master of Agriculture and Management
    • 515. Doctor of Engineering
    • 518. Doctor of Education
    • 519. Doctor of Philosophy
    • REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
    • 521. University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement
    • 522. Baccalaureate Degree Requirement in General Education.
    • 523. Criteria for General Education Certification.
    • DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES
    • 524. Posthumous Recognition of Undergraduate Achievements
    • 525. Certificate of Completion
    • COURSES
    • 526. Academic Credit
    • 527. Course Prerequisites
    • 528. Credit by Examination
    • 529. Course Approval
    • 530. Guest Lecturers
    • 531. Variable-Unit Courses
    • 532. Academic Credit for Internships
    • A533. Independent Study Program
    • 534. Course Evaluations
    • 535. Special Study Courses
    • 536. Grading in Beginning Language Courses
    • 537. Undergraduate Course Outline Requirement
    • 538. Examinations
    • 539. Mandatory First Day Attendance
    • GRADES
    • A540. Grading
    • A541. Uniform Grading Standards
    • 542. Changing a Final Grade
    • A545. Passed or Not Passed Grading
    • A546. Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory Grading
    • REGISTRATION
    • 547. Adding or Dropping a Course
    • 549. Registration at Other UC Campuses
    • ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
    • 550. Academic Dishonesty
    • HONORS
    • 551. Honors
    • EXPECTED AND MINIMUM PROGRESS
    • A552. Expected and Minimum Progress
    • CREDIT FOR COURSES
    • A553. Credit for Courses Taken at Other Institutions
    • 554. Credit for Concurrent Courses
    • PROGRAM REVIEW
    • 556. Undergraduate Program Review
    • RESIDENCE AND PART-TIME STUDY
    • C560. Degree Programs
    • C561. Part-Time Students
    • C562. Minimum Progress and Normative Time
    • 610. Residence in a Term
    • REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGHER DEGREES
      500. General Requirements for Master’s Degrees
      (A) Departments or fields of study in which students may become candidates for Master’s degrees and specific departmental regulations must be approved by the Graduate Council and are published in the Announcement of the Graduate Division.
      (B) Students will pursue one of the following plans for fulfillment of the requirements for the Master’s degree, depending on the advice of the program selected for the major work. One or the other or both plans may be adopted. Programs adopting both plans shall designate the plan to be followed by each student.
      Plan I. There are required 30 units of graduate and upper division courses (the 100 and 200 series only) and, in addition, a thesis or a project in lieu of a thesis. At least 12 of the 30 units must be graduate work in the major field. The student is subject to guidance by the major program regarding the distribution of his or her work.
      Plan II. There are required 36 units of graduate and upper division courses, of which at least 18 units must be graduate courses in the major field. Not more than 9 units of research (299 or equivalent) may be used to satisfy the 18-unit requirement. A comprehensive final examination in the major subject, of such nature and conducted in such manner as may be determined by the program concerned, is required of each candidate.
      (C) The following rules apply.
      (1) Programs may specify requirements in addition to those listed above to be completed by their students under either plan.
      (2) Only courses in the 100 and 200 series in which the student is assigned grades of C- or better, or S, may be counted in satisfaction of the requirements for the Master’s degree under either plan. Courses in the 300 and 400 series may be accepted if they have been approved by the Graduate Council. Furthermore, the student must maintain an average of three grade points per unit in all of the above courses except those graded S or U.
      (3) For those under Plan I:
      (a) The thesis or project subject must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies as indicated on the form submitted for Advancement to Candidacy.
      (b) A committee of a minimum of three shall be appointed by the Dean to pass finally upon the merits of the Master’s thesis or project. Whenever possible, one member of the committee shall be chosen from a department other than that of the major subject. (Am. 1/24/72)
      501. Master of Arts or Master of Science
      (A) Under Plan I, a candidate for the Master of Arts or Master of Science degree must complete a thesis.
      (B) Each accepted thesis must be deposited by the candidate in the office of the Dean of Graduate Studies for transfer to the University Library.
      (C) Each thesis must be prepared in the form prescribed by the Graduate Council. (Am. 1/24/72)
      502. Master of Education
      (A) The candidate must satisfy the requirement for Plan II for the Master’s degree, except that only 12 of the 36 units need be in graduate level (200 series) courses.
      (B) The candidate must either (1) have an approved teaching credential or (2) complete a program including at least 9 units of approved prerequisite courses that will, in the judgment of the committee in charge of his or her field of specialization, ensure an adequate preparation for successful work in that field. (Am. and renum. 1/24/72)
      503. Master of Engineering
      (A) The candidate must satisfy the requirements for Plan II for the Master’s degree, except that only 12 of the 36 units need be in graduate (200 series) courses.
      (B) The candidate shall demonstrate competence in the design of structures, circuits, machines, or processes appropriate to the field of specialization. Subject to the approval of the Graduate Council, the program of study will be determined and administered by the College of Engineering.
      (C) The program of each candidate shall be under the supervision of a faculty committee appointed by the Dean of the College of Engineering. (Am. and renum. 1/24/72)
      504. Master of Fine Arts
      (A) The candidate must satisfy the minimum requirements for Plan I of the Master’s degree and shall submit a suitable project in lieu of a thesis.
      (B) The candidate must complete a minimum of 48 units of acceptable graduate, undergraduate, and professional courses. (Am. 1/24/72)
      505. Master of Health Services
      (A) The candidate must satisfy the minimum requirements for Plan I of the Master’s degree.
      (B) The candidate must satisfactorily complete a minimum period of one quarter as an intern or resident, as specified in the program proposal for the specific field of study. (App. by Rep. Assembly 1/24/72, effective 10/19/72)
      506. Master of Arts in Teaching
      (A) The candidate must satisfy the requirements for Plan II of the Master's degree.
      (B) The candidate must complete a minimum of 18 units in professional courses in Education. (App. by Rep. Assembly 1/24/72, effective 10/19/72)
      507. Master of Business Administration
      (A) The candidate must complete 72 units (approximately 24 courses) of acceptable graduate, professional, and undergraduate courses.
      (B) The core courses may be waived and the total course load reduced for students who have completed equivalent courses at another accredited institution of higher learning. However, students must complete a minimum of 14 courses in the program to qualify for the degree.
      (C) A part-time student may enroll in no more than two courses per quarter (excluding lower division remedial courses). (App. 10/28/75; Am. 10/30/89)
      508. Master of Agriculture and Management
      (A) The candidate must satisfy the minimum requirements of Plan II for the Master’s degree.
      (B) The candidate must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 42 units of acceptable graduate, professional and undergraduate courses.
      (C) The graduate adviser will appoint a minimum of three faculty members to serve as a guidance committee for each student in the program.
      (D) In addition to (A) and (B), the candidate must satisfactorily complete 20 weeks of full-time internship in a work experience approved by the guidance committee. (App. by Rep. Assembly 4/21/80)
      515. Doctor of Engineering
        The degree of Doctor of Engineering will be granted on the following conditions.
      (A) The candidate shall have received the Bachelor’s degree from the University of California in an engineering curriculum that provides adequate preparation for the proposed major field of study, or shall have successfully pursued a course of study equivalent to that represented by such a degree.
      (B) The candidate shall have completed at least two years of graduate residence at the University of California.
      (C) The candidate shall have completed a program of study in one of the major professional fields of engineering approved as such by the Coordinating Committee on Graduate Affairs. The program of study shall normally include such preparation in fields other than engineering as will provide broad support for the candidate’s professional studies, and shall be approved in each case by the department. The student must maintain a minimum average of three grade points per unit in all course work undertaken except those courses graded S or U. (Am. 1/24/72)
      (D) Before advancement to candidacy for the degree, the student shall have passed qualifying examinations in the major professional field and in such supporting minor fields as the department shall in each case designate. The department may, in such cases as it deems appropriate, require of any prospective candidate an examination in the reading knowledge of a foreign language.
      (E) The candidate shall have submitted an acceptable dissertation in a field of professional application which shall demonstrate, through a comprehensive analysis of design, a grasp of economic or other feasibility factors as well as a knowledge of the technical features of the problem with which it deals.
      (F) Except as otherwise provided in this Regulation, procedure before and during candidacy for the degree shall conform to that provided for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy under Plan B. (App. 1/26/71)
      518. Doctor of Education
        The Doctor of Education degree will prepare educational leaders for important positions in the public schools as administrators, policy analysts, resource persons and consultants on issues related to educational reform, planning, fiscal controls and personnel issues, as well as for teaching careers in universities, community colleges or other institutions.
      (A) Normally the candidate shall come with an M.A. degree or equivalent and shall have a minimum GPA of 3.2 in upper division undergraduate and M.A. coursework.
      (B) The candidate shall have completed a program of study which shall normally include core courses (required courses that are normally taken by an entire cohort), fieldwork practicum, elective courses selected by the candidate from one or more areas of emphasis, and dissertation research.
      (C) There is no foreign language requirement.
      (D) All candidates shall complete at least a two-semester field-based research project, apart from routine field-based assignments related to the coursework. This project is expected to lead to the dissertation research design and should be conducted under the mentorship of a faculty member.
      (E) The candidate shall normally be expected to construct a dissertation proposal with a clear theoretical framework, an adequate collection of original data, a critical analysis of the data collected, and a direct and specific discussion of the implications of theory and data for educational policy and/or practice.
      (F) Except as otherwise provided in this Regulation, procedure before and during candidacy for the degree shall conform to that provided in Davis Division Regulation 520 for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy under Plan B. (En. 10/31/90; App. Assembly 11/20/90)
      519. Doctor of Philosophy
        Each department or group is permitted to adopt regulations for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, provided that the regulations are compatible with the following sections and are approved by the Graduate Council. Each department or group must keep a current statement of such regulations filed with the Dean of Graduate Studies. (App. 1/26/71)
      (A) Qualifying Examinations.
         Before admission to candidacy, a student must have met any deficiencies in his or her training, must have maintained a minimum average of three grade points per unit in all course work undertaken except those courses graded S or U, and must have passed a series of qualifying examinations (including any required tests of a reading knowledge of foreign languages) before a committee to be appointed by the Graduate Council for that purpose. The program primarily concerned with any examination will be asked to suggest to the Administrative Committee of the Graduate Council the names of persons to be included on such examining committees, but appointment shall be made by the Dean of Graduate Studies, who will advise all parties concerned. (Am. 1/26/71; 1/24/72; Renum. 12/80)
      (B) Advancement to Candidacy.
         Immediately following the successful completion of the qualifying examination, each student should apply on the form provided by the Dean of Graduate Studies for advancement to candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. If the program so recommends, a student who has been officially advanced to candidacy may be awarded the degree, Candidate in Philosophy. (App. 1/26/71; Renum. 12/80)
      (C) Dissertation. (Renum. 12/80)
      (1) A dissertation on a subject chosen by the candidate, bearing on the principal subject of study and of such character as to show ability to prosecute independent investigation, must receive the approval of the special committee in charge of the dissertation and of the Graduate Council before the degree is recommended. Special emphasis will be placed upon this requirement, and the degree will in no case be given merely for the faithful completion of a course of study, however extensive.
      (2) The dissertation must be in a form acceptable to the Graduate Council.
      (3) Not later than three weeks before the end of the quarter in which the degree is to be conferred, the candidate shall file with the Dean of Graduate Studies one copy of the dissertation (the original if typewritten) approved by the committee in charge. An abstract of the dissertation must be filed by the same date. (Am. 02/25/05)
      (D) The candidate shall be subject to the provisions of either Plan A, Plan B or Plan C as outlined below, depending upon the program primarily concerned with his or her field of study. Each program is required to adopt one of these three plans. (Am. 02/25/05)
      (1) Plan A.
          The Graduate Council shall appoint a committee of a minimum of 5 members, including its chair. This committee will be designated as the Dissertation Committee and Final Examination Committee and the chair of this committee will be the candidate’s major professor. This Committee shall determine whether the candidate has met the requirements for the degree, in accordance with the following procedure. (Am. 06/01/06)
      (a) A minimum of 3 of the members of the committee shall be designated at the time of appointment to guide the candidate in his or her research and to pass on the merits of the dissertation. This portion of the committee will be designated as the Dissertation Committee. This Committee and the candidate shall arrange for such conferences as may be necessary for the complete elucidation of the subject treated in the dissertation. (Am. 06/01/06)
      (b) A final oral examination, as described below in section (E), shall be required.
      (c) Admission to the final examination may be restricted to members of the committee, members of the Academic Senate, and guests of equivalent rank at other institutions.
      (2) Plan B.
          The Graduate Council shall appoint a committee of a minimum of 3 members, including its chair. This committee will be designated as the Dissertation Committee and the chair of this committee will be the candidate’s major professor. This Committee shall determine whether the candidate has met the requirements for the degree, in accordance with the following procedure: (Am. 02/28/05; 06/01/06)
      (a) The committee members shall guide the candidate in his or her research and shall pass upon the merits of the dissertation. This committee and the candidate shall arrange for such conferences as may be necessary for the complete elucidation of the subject treated in the dissertation.
      (b) At the discretion of the Dissertation Committee, a final oral examination, as described below in section (E), may be held. If the Dissertation Committee decides to hold a final oral examination, it will assume the role of the Dissertation and Final Examination Committee.
      (c) At the discretion of the graduate program, an exit seminar may be required of all candidates. Satisfaction of this requirement shall be verified by the chair of the Dissertation Committee. (Am. 02/28/05; 06/01/06)
      (3) Plan C.
          The Graduate Council shall appoint a committee of a minimum of 3 members, including its chair. This committee will be designated as the Dissertation and Final Examination Committee and the chair of this committee will be the candidate’s major professor. This Committee shall determine whether the candidate has met the requirements for the degree, in accordance with the following procedure: (Am. 02/28/05; 06/01/06)
      (a) The committee members which shall guide the candidate in his or her research and shall pass upon the merits of the dissertation. The committee and the candidate shall arrange for such conferences as may be necessary for the complete elucidation of the subject treated in the dissertation.
      (b) A final oral examination, as described below in section (E), shall be required.
      (c) There is no exit seminar requirement for this plan.
      (E) Final Oral Examination
         A final oral examination, where required under the applicable plan, shall be conducted in accordance with the following procedure:
      (1) All members of the Dissertation and Final Examination Committee shall conduct a final oral examination of the candidate. This examination shall be held after oral presentation of the dissertation to the Dissertation Committee but before final action has been taken on it. The final oral examination shall consist primarily of questions arising out of the relationship of the dissertation to the general field of study in which the subject of the dissertation lies.
      (2) Admission to the final oral examination may be restricted, wholly or in part, at the discretion of the Graduate Program. If admission is restricted, it shall include all members of the Dissertation and Final Examination Committee and may include other members of the Academic Senate and/or guests of equivalent rank at other institutions.
      REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
      521. University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement (En. 6/1/2006)
      A. The University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement is a reading and writing proficiency requirement governed by Senate Regulation 636 and this Divisional Regulation. (En. 6/1/2006)
      B. Prior to enrollment at the University of California, each student may satisfy the University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement as specified by Senate Regulation 636. (En. 6/1/2006)
      C. A student who has not satisfied the University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement prior to enrollment in the University of California, Davis must satisfy the requirement either (En. 6/1/2006)
      1. by passing the University of California Analytical Writing Placement Exam administered Systemwide or on the Davis campus, or (En. 6/1/2006)
      2. by passing Workload 57, offered by Sacramento City College, with a grade of C or better. (En. 6/1/2006)
      D. The final examination for Workload 57 shall be the University of California Analytical Writing Placement Exam, which shall be evaluated by instructors from both UC Davis and Sacramento City College. (En. 6/1/2006)
      E. A student must satisfy the University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement as early as possible during the first year in residence at the University of California. A student who has not done so after three quarters of enrollment will not be eligible to enroll for a fourth quarter. Students placed into Linguistics 21, 22 and/or 23 will have three quarters plus one quarter for each required Linguistics course to meet the requirement. (En. 6/1/2006)
      522. Baccalaureate Degree Requirement in General Education.
      (A) Each candidate for a baccalaureate degree shall satisfy a General Education requirement comprising two components: Topical Breadth and Core Literacies. (Am. 6/6/2008)
      (1) The Topical Breadth component shall be separated into three subject matter areas: Arts and Humanities; Science and Engineering; and Social Sciences. (Am. 6/6/2008)
      (2) The Core Literacies component shall have four parts: Literacy with Words and Images; Civic and Cultural Literacy; Quantitative Literacy; and Scientific Literacy. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (B) The Topical Breadth component shall be satisfied by passing between 12 and 20 units of courses in each subject matter area, for a total of 52 units from all three areas. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (C) The Core Literacies component shall be satisfied by passing at least the specified number of units of coursework in the following four parts: (En. 6/6/2008)
      (1) Literacy with Words and Images shall be satisfied with: (En. 6/6/2008)
      8 units or the equivalent of English Composition coursework (as specified by the candidate’s college); (En. 6/6/2008)
      6 units of designated writing experience coursework in the candidate’s major or elsewhere; (En. 6/6/2008)
      3 units of additional designated coursework in either oral skills or writing experience; and (En. 6/6/2008)
      3 units of designated coursework in visual literacy. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (2) Civic and Cultural Literacy shall be satisfied with (En. 6/6/2008)
      6 units of designated coursework in American cultures, governance and history, of which at least 3 units must be in domestic diversity; and (En. 6/6/2008)
      3 units of designated coursework in world cultures. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (3) Quantitative Literacy shall be satisfied with 3 units of designated coursework in quantitative literacy. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (4) Scientific Literacy shall be satisfied with 3 units of designated coursework in scientific literacy. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (D) In satisfying the General Education requirement: (Am. 6/6/2008)
      (1) Course units that satisfy requirements in the candidate’s major or majors may also be counted toward satisfaction of General Education requirements.
      (2) While some courses may be certified in more than one of the three subject matter areas for Topical Breadth, no student may count a given course in more than one subject matter area. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (3) No course may be counted by a student toward the satisfaction of more than one of the four Core Literacies. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (4) With the exception of the 8 units of designated English Composition coursework, a course offered toward the satisfaction of the Core Literacies component may also be offered in satisfaction of the Topical Breadth component. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (5) No course passed prior to satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing Requirement shall be offered toward satisfaction of the General Education requirements for writing experience coursework. (Am. 6/6/2008)
      (6) Candidates may not present Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate credit in satisfaction of General Education requirements, except insofar as it may be applied to the English Composition component of the Literacy with Words and Images requirement. (En. 6/6/2008, Am. 6/3/2011)
      (7) Transfer students who have successfully completed the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) are exempt from all General Education requirements that may be met with lower-division courses. (Am. 6/6/2008, 6/3/2011)
      (8) Students transferring to UC Davis who have not completed the IGETC curriculum shall satisfy all General Education requirements as specified by this Regulation, but may offer previously completed coursework toward their satisfaction. (Am. 6/6/2008, 6/3/2011)
      (9) The Committee on Courses of Instruction has authority to delegate and to rescind prior delegation to the Deans of the undergraduate colleges the authority to determine the suitability of non-UC Davis courses presented by new and continuing undergraduate students in satisfaction of General Education requirements. (En. 6/3/2011)
      (10) Subject to the limits otherwise applicable, candidates may elect Passed/Not Passed grading for courses fulfilling General Education requirements. (En. 6/6/2008)
      523. Criteria for General Education Certification. (Am. 6/6/2008)
      (A) Any undergraduate course carrying credit toward graduation is eligible for assignment to a Topical Breadth area if it takes a critical, analytical perspective on knowledge, considering how knowledge has been acquired, and the assumptions, theories, or paradigms that guide its interpretation. Where appropriate, a course may be assigned to more than one Topical Breadth area, and most courses are expected to be assigned to one or more areas. (Am. 6/6/2008)
      (B) The criteria for the English Composition requirement shall be specified by the several undergraduate colleges, subject only to the condition that no fewer than 8 units or the equivalent shall be required. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (C) The Committee on General Education’s criteria governing certification of courses for the Core Literacies component of General Education shall be consonant with the following: (En. 6/6/2008)
      (1) A course providing Writing Experience promotes the student’s ability to think clearly and communicate effectively about the course material through guided writing assignments completed in stages. Guidance may take the form of class discussions, peer feedback, individual or small group conferences, or written (including online) feedback. Students must be given feedback designed to promote improvement in writing in the course. Feedback may occur in the context of one or more successive, refined submissions of a single assignment, or over a series of multiple assignments. Students receive the current version of the handout on plagiarism from Student Judicial Affairs. Grading criteria are articulated in advance of the due date. The writing is evaluated for content, clarity, organization, and logic. A 1 unit course requires a minimum of 5 pages of writing; a course of 2 or more units requires a minimum of 10 pages, possibly in a series of staged tasks or shorter assignments. Approval may be sought for shorter assignments that total fewer than 5 or 10 pages when they are appropriate and clearly justified. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (2) A course in Oral Skills strengthens a student’s ability to understand and orally communicate ideas while using critical thinking. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (3) A course in Visual Literacy improves a student’s ability to understand ideas presented visually and to communicate knowledge and ideas by visual means. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (4) A course in American Cultures, Governance and History provides an understanding of the historical processes, institutional structures, and core analytic skills necessary to think critically about the nature of citizenship, government and social relations in the United States. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (a) A course in Domestic Diversity provides an understanding of issues such as race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and religion within the United States, and develops the student’s ability to think critically about diverse socio-cultural perspectives. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (5) A course in World Cultures combines the historical and social context with the core analytic skills necessary to understand and adopt a critical perspective on society, politics and/or culture in one or more cultures outside the United States. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (6) A course in Quantitative Literacy develops a student’s ability to reason quantitatively and to evaluate quantitative arguments encountered in everyday life. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (7) A course in Scientific Literacy instructs students in the fundamental ways scientists use experimentation and analysis to approach problems and generate new knowledge, and presents the ways scientific findings relate to other disciplines and to public policy. (En. 6/6/2008)
      (D) In extraordinary circumstances, for example, for majors subject to external accreditation, the General Education Committee may certify that the fulfillment of the major requirements meets specified parts of the General Education requirement. The major requirements must include courses that fulfill the objectives of the relevant parts of the General Education requirement. (En. 6/6/2008)
      DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES
      524. Posthumous Recognition of Undergraduate Achievements
      (A) A student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher who had completed all requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree, or was within 15 quarter units of having done so, shall be awarded the Bachelor’s Degree.
      (B) A student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher who had completed 84.0 or more quarter units, but who would not have been eligible for the award of the Bachelor’s Degree under the provisions of Paragraph (A) above, shall be posthumously awarded a certificate recognizing the student’s upper division standing. (En. 2/02/90; Am. 02/03/06; effective 02/03/06)
      525. Certificate of Completion
        The School of Education and the Department of Human & Community Development, in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, with the approval of the Davis Division Graduate Council are authorized to issue Certificates of Completion to persons who have fulfilled the requirements of the various curricula for candidates for teaching credentials. A typical form of the certificate to be issued is as follows:

      Sample Certificate

      COURSES
      526. Academic Credit
        The quantitative measure of academic work in the Division shall be the "Unit of Credit." One unit of credit shall be assigned to the student for each three hours of academic work per week. The standard distribution of work for a unit of credit shall be one hour of lecture or discussion presided over by an instructor in class and two hours of preparation outside class. In laboratory courses two or three hours of work in the laboratory shall be assigned for each unit of credit. Exceptions to these standards must be authorized by the Davis Division Committee on Courses of Instruction.
      527. Course Prerequisites
      (A) The instructor in charge of a course is responsible for determining that enrolled students have completed the prerequisite course(s) listed in the General Catalog. Students who have completed equivalent work may be admitted to the course at the instructor's discretion.
      (B) The instructor in charge of a course may request that the Registrar drop from the course any student who has enrolled without completing the published prerequisites if, in the judgment of the instructor, failure to have completed that work seriously reduces the probability that the student will successfully complete the course. An instructor who intends to exclude a student for this reason must notify the student before taking action. (Am. 4/19/99; effective 9/1/99).
      528. Credit by Examination
        Academic credit by examination is available to registered students, under the following conditions:
      (A) The privilege of taking an examination for credit usually will be granted only to students (undergraduate and graduate) enrolled in UC Davis degree programs who are in good standing and are registered either in the current quarter or semester, or in the spring quarter or semester prior to a summer session in which the examination is taken. (Academic Senate Reg. 540 and 542). Application shall be made on a petition form available from the Registrar. (Am. 6/8/2012)
      (B) Credit by examination may be applied for in any course listed in the current General Catalog. The application must be approved by the instructor who will administer the examination and by the dean of the student’s college or school, in the case of an undergraduate student, or the Dean of Graduate Studies, in the case of a graduate student. The instructor will specify the examination date.
      (C) The application, if approved by the appropriate dean, is forwarded to the Registrar, who issues to the student a permit for the examination and sends notice of the action to the instructor or examiner by whom the examination is to be conducted. The examination may not be taken until the permit has been issued. (Am. 6/9/81)
      (D) Credit by examination is not available (a) if such credit would duplicate credit presented by the student for admission to the University; (b) in elementary courses in a foreign language which is the native tongue of the applicant; or (c) in subjects for which the University has no competent examiner.
      (E) Credit earned by examination may not be applied toward satisfaction of the General Education requirement. (En. 10/28/86)
      (F) The final result of a student’s work in an examination for credit shall be reported to the Registrar in terms of the following grades: A, B, C, D, F, P, NP, S, U. The "I" grade (incomplete) is not acceptable. Optional P/NP or S/U grading is subject to approval by the appropriate dean. (Renum. 10/28/86) (Am. 4/30/2013)
      529. Course Approval
        Initiating, changing and canceling courses of instruction shall require the approval of the Faculty of the College/School initiating the action and the Committee on Courses of Instruction. Graduate courses shall, in addition, require the approval of the Graduate Council.
      530. Guest Lecturers
        The instructor in charge of a course shall normally have primary responsibility for determining the use and appropriateness of guest lecturers. In the event a guest lecturer is to appear on several occasions in a course, the Davis Division Committee on Courses of Instruction shall be notified and shall determine whether such participation involves substantial responsibility for the content and conduct of the course. If such is the case, the guest shall participate only if the Chief Campus Officer authorizes an appropriate academic title for the guest. (En. 5/29/69)
      531. Variable-Unit Courses
      (A) Each variable-unit course must be actively supervised by an officer of instruction who holds a lecturer or professorial title. (Am. 1/24/72)
      (B) Registration in variable-unit courses for undergraduate students must be approved by the chair (or his or her equivalent) of the department concerned. The approval must be based on a written proposal submitted to the chair by the instructor in charge. (En. 1/24/72)
      532. Academic Credit for Internships
      (A) A maximum of 15 units of internship courses, whether taken in this Division or elsewhere, may be counted toward the 180 units required for graduation (Am 1/14/72; 4/23/79; 4/25/83; 6/05/01). Internships for which academic credit toward the baccalaureate degree may be earned shall have the following features:
      (1) Students are able to apply the concepts and methods of at lest one academic discipline to an appropriate work experience or setting.
      (2) Students are able to grow intellectually by the extension of general intellectual tools of one or more academic disciplines to the workplace. Work that is clerical in nature or that involves routine maintenance or service responsibilities shall not be judged appropriate for awarding academic credit.
      (3) Faculty sponsors are able to assess the quality of academic work completed by the student.
      (B) A student for whom academic credit earned in an internship may be awarded:
      (1) Possesses a suitable background in the discipline in which academic credit is sought;
      (2) Possesses the background or skills necessary to successfully complete the requirements of the internship;
      (3) Will experience significant intellectual growth as a result of the internship and the associated academic work, and;
      (4) Has completed at least 84 units toward the degree. No student shall receive University credit for an internship numbered 192 unless he/she has completed a minimum of 84 units.
      (C) When it is determined that an internship and student are appropriate for academic credit, arrangements for receiving it shall include the following elements:
      (1) Prior approval by the appropriate Program Manager in the Internship and Career Center (ICC) certifying that the internship situation is appropriate for awarding academic credit. The student shall submit a written description of the proposed internship to ICC, accompanied by a letter from the sponsor that describes the student’s duties and responsibilities, hours, and the sponsor’s expectations. Evidence must be provided that the student intern will be directly supervised by a career professional who is aware of the University’s standards for earning academic credit.
      (2) Prior approval by a faculty sponsor whose background and expertise are related to the area of the internship and appropriate for supervision of the student’s activities.
      (3) Adherence to departmental guidelines that set forth requirements for granting academic credit. Requirements may vary depending on the nature of the discipline, but generally it is expected that a student will complete reading assignments and a research paper or project that requires the student to relate the academic discipline to the internship experience. The paper/project shall demonstrate the student’s ability to perform critical reasoning and/or methods of research appropriate to the discipline. Student participation in a concurrent seminar or discussion section may also be required, but student achievement must be documented.
      (4) Appropriate faculty/student contact that includes a preliminary conference to set forth the faculty member’s expectations and requirements for satisfactory completion of the internship.
      (D) The number of units awarded shall be contingent on the degree of commitment to the internship project, and departmental requirements shall adhere to that principle (EN. 6/04/85). The basic formula is one unit of credit per three hours per week commitment for a ten-week period; thus:
      Commitment Per Week Units
      3 - 5 hours 1
      6 - 8 hours 2
      9 - 11 hours 3
      12 - 14 hours 4
      15 - 17 hours 5
      18 - 20 hours 6
      21 - 23 hours 7
      24 - 26 hours 8
      27 - 29 hours 9
      30 - 32 hours 10
      33 - 35 hours 11
      36 - 38 hours 12
      39 - 41 hours 13
      42 - 44 hours 14
      45 hours and over 15 (am. 5/6/02)
      A533. Independent Study Program
        A student registered in the Independent Study Program may enroll for a maximum of 15 units of Special Study courses in one quarter. [See DDR 535] (En. 11/28/79)
      534. Course Evaluations
        In every course designated by the Committee on Courses of Instruction, all instructors must implement a course evaluation procedure in such a manner as to afford to each student the ability to evaluate the instructor and the course. Such evaluations shall be made available to the instructor after grades for the course have been submitted. The evaluation procedure shall, to the fullest extent possible, preserve the anonymity of the student and restrict the identification of the course instructor to authorized persons only, including the Committee on Academic Personnel and others involved in the academic personnel process and in the selection of course instructors. (En. 4/17/2012)
      535. Special Study Courses
      (A) Special Study courses are research-oriented, variable unit courses of study designed for one student under the supervision of one faculty member. No student shall receive academic credit for a special study course numbered 194H or 199 unless he/she previously has completed at least 84 units of credit toward the degree.
      (B) With the approval of the Department Chair an instructor may provide a special study course to an interested student. The content of the course shall not duplicate the content of an existing course, and the amount of work proposed shall at least equal that required for a regularly offered course of corresponding academic unit value. Grading in undergraduate special study courses shall be on a "Passed/Not Passed" basis unless the instructor has approval for letter grading from the Committee on Courses of Instruction of either the college or school as well as the Division.
      (C) Requests for letter grading in special study courses must be received by the Divisional Committee on Courses of Instruction no later than the fifteenth day of instruction in the quarter in which the course is offered.
      (D) Special study courses for undergraduates shall be numbered 99, 199, or 194H (En. 1/24/72)
      536. Grading in Beginning Language Courses
        A student who has completed a second or more advanced year of high-school-level course work in a foreign language in tenth, eleventh, or twelfth grade shall be awarded credit for Course 1 (or its equivalent) in that language only if he or she takes the course on a Passed or Not Passed basis under the option authorized by Davis Division Regulation A545(A), subject to the limits specified in Davis Division Regulation A545(B). (Am. and effective 2/14/78)
      537. Undergraduate Course Outline Requirement
      (A) By the end of the first week of instruction, the instructor will provide students with a course outline containing information regarding the anticipated: topical content of the course, amount and kind of work expected, and examination and grading procedures.
      (B) By the end of the first week of instruction, the office hours of the instructor will be made available to the students. (En. 3/13/95 and effective 9/1/95)
      538. Examinations
      (A) Except under certain specified circumstances, Senate Regulation (SR) 772 requires that final examinations be given in all undergraduate courses. Final examinations may be given in graduate courses. (Am. 4/26/82)
      (B) At the instructor’s option, a final examination in any course other than an on-line course may be wholly or in part of the take-home type. All examinations for on-line courses must be proctored to ensure that the person taking the examination is the student receiving credit. In accordance with SR 772(A), in undergraduate courses, the writing time of a take-home final examination and an in-class final examination together may not exceed three hours. (Am. 5/4/04)
      (C) In each course for which a final examination is required, each student shall have the right to take a final examination (or, when the instructor has so opted, to submit a take-home examination) at the time and on the date published in the Class Search Tool. For on-line courses, the University Registrar will offer to the instructor of each on-line class the option to have the final in the last time slot on the last day of finals or at a time on dead day to be negotiated between the University Registrar and the instructor. Students shall be notified of the time and place of the final on or before the first day of instruction. (Am. 5/4/04)
      (D) In each course (other than in an on-line course) for which a midterm examination is required, each student shall have the right to take a midterm examination (or, when the instructor has so opted, to submit a take-home examination) during one of the scheduled meetings of the class published in the Class Search Tool. (Am. 4/26/82; 5/4/04)
      (E) Holding a final or midterm examination (or setting a deadline for submission of a take-home examination) at a time not specified in (C) or (D) requires the mutual consent of the instructor and all students involved in the change (other than in an on-line course). Any student who does not consent in writing to the different time must be permitted to take an examination (and/or submit a take-home examination) at the officially scheduled time. A student who consents in writing to the change of examination time waives the right cited in (C) or (D). (Am. 3/13/95 and effective 9/1/95; 5/4/04)
      (F) Any departures from the published examination schedule should be carried out so as not to disadvantage students who are unable to accept the alternative examination schedule. An in-class final examination may not be rescheduled for a date earlier than the first day of final week. The due date for a take-home final examination may not be rescheduled for a date earlier than the first day of finals week. In the case of on-line courses, the published examination schedule is that announced no later than the first day of class in accordance with 538(C), and finals may be scheduled or rescheduled to occur on dead day. (Am. 10/26/87 and effective 9/1/88) (Am. 3/13/95 and effective 9/1/95; 5/4/04)
      (G) A student who is improperly denied the right cited in (C) or (D) may file a petition with the Executive Council by the end of the next regular term, for appropriate action.
      (H) In accordance with current law, students with documented disabilities may be entitled to in-class accommodations. The student shall provide a letter from the campus Student Disability Center (SDC) with a recommendation for those academic accommodations that the instructor is responsible for providing. It is the student’s responsibility to request accommodations as soon as possible; this notification must be made within a period of time which allows the university a reasonable opportunity to evaluate the request and offer necessary adjustments. The instructor has a legal obligation to provide recommended academic accommodations, unless the instructor can demonstrate that the accommodations will fundamentally alter the nature of the academic demands made of the student, or decrease the standards and types of academic performance. It is the responsibility of the University to provide recommended physical accommodations. No accommodation shall require facilities or personnel that can be demonstrated to result in undue financial and administrative burdens to the University. The instructor should consult with the student and the SDC if there are any questions or concerns. If the instructor and the SDC cannot arrive at a mutually agreeable accommodation, the matter shall be resolved by a committee convened by the Vice Chancellor - Student Affairs that includes the instructor, the department chair, and a representative from the SDC. (En. 6/8/87; Am 11/25/96; Am 4/14/08) (Am. 6/8/2012)
      (I) An instructor may release to individual students their original final examinations (or copies thereof) at any time. Otherwise the instructor shall retain final examination materials, or a copy thereof, until the end of the next regular term, during which period students shall have access to their examinations. (En. 5/25/77; Renum. 6/8/87)
      (J) Paragraphs (A) through (I) of this Regulation shall be printed in the General Catalog. (En. 5/24/76; Am. and renum. 5/25/77; 6/8/87)
      539. Mandatory First Day Attendance
      (A) Departments or other academic programs may require first day attendance in impacted courses but shall not deny enrollment to a student when space is available. Mandatory First Day Attendance must be announced in the Class Search Tool. (En. 6/3/04)
      (B) Departments or other academic programs may require first day attendance in laboratory courses (impacted or not impacted). Mandatory First Day Attendance must be announced in the Class Search Tool. (En. 6/3/04)
      GRADES
      A540. Grading
        Except as provided otherwise in Davis Division Regulations A545 and A548, and in Regulation 70 of the Faculty of the School of Medicine, the following provisions apply to the grading of the work of all students subject to Davis Division Regulations.
      (A) The work of each student shall be reported in terms of the following grades: A (excellent), B (good), C (fair), D (poor), F (failure), I (incomplete), and IP (in progress). Grades of A, B, C, and D may be modified by plus (+) or minus (-) suffixes. (En. 4/23/78, Am. 11/28/79)
      (B) Grade points per unit shall be assigned by the Registrar as follows: A - 4; B - 3; C - 2; D - 1; F, I, or IP - none. "Minus" grades shall be assigned three-tenths grade point less per unit than unsuffixed grades, and "plus" grades (except A+) shall be assigned three-tenths grade point more per unit. The grade of A+ shall be assigned 4.0 grade points per unit, the same as for an unsuffixed A; but when A+ is reported it represents extraordinary achievement.
      (C) The grade Incomplete shall be assigned only when the student’s completed work (judged by itself and not in relation to the work required to pass the course as a whole) is of passing quality and represents a significant portion of the requirements for a final grade, but is incomplete for good cause as determined by the instructor. "Good cause" may include illness, serious personal problems, an accident, a death in the immediate family, a large and necessary increase in working hours, or other situations deemed to be of equal gravity. The student is entitled to replace this grade by a passing grade and to receive appropriate grade points and unit credit provided he or she satisfactorily completes the work of the course in a way specified by the instructor before the end of the third succeeding term of the student’s academic residence as defined in Regulation 610. If a degree is conferred upon the student before the expiration of the time limit for conversion, the time limit for conversion for the graduated student shall be the end of the third regular term succeeding the term in which the Incomplete grade was assigned. If the time limit for conversion expires before a degree is conferred upon the student and the Incomplete grade has not been replaced, the grade shall revert to an F, a Not Passed, or an Unsatisfactory, depending on the grading system in effect in the particular instance. If the time limit expires after a degree has been conferred and the Incomplete grade has not been replaced, the Incomplete grade shall remain on the student’s record. If the degree has not been conferred, and the work has not been completed before the end of the term three calendar years after the grade Incomplete has been assigned, and during which the student has not been in academic residence as defined in Regulation 610, the grade Incomplete shall remain on the student’s record, unless the course is repeated. This time-limit for the completion of courses assigned the grade Incomplete shall apply to all and only those courses in which the grade Incomplete is assigned on or after September 1, 2010. (En. 1/20/75, Am. 5/29/75, effective Fall 1975; Am. 10/25/76, effective Winter 1977; Am. 6/4/79, Am. 11/28/79, effective Fall 1980; Am. 6/3/80, Am. 12/3/80; Am. 4/25/83; Am. 11/30/83) (Am. 9/1/2010, 2/24/2011, 9/1/2013)
      In calculating an undergraduate student’s grade point average, grade points and units for courses graded Incomplete shall not be counted except that, in ascertaining compliance with the 2.000 minimum grade point average required for the receipt of a bachelor’s degree, all incomplete units attempted for a letter grade shall be counted and assigned a grade point value of zero. Any undergraduate student who accumulates more than 16 units of Incomplete for which final grades have not been assigned shall be subject to academic probation or disqualification. (Am. 1/27/81) (Am. 9/1/2010)
      In calculating a graduate student’s grade point average, grade points and units for courses graded Incomplete shall not be counted except that, in ascertaining compliance with the minimum grade point average required for receipt of a degree, all incomplete units attempted for a letter grade shall not be counted and assigned a grade point value of zero. Any graduate student who accumulates more than 8 units of Incomplete for which final grades have not been assigned shall be subject to academic probation. (Am. 10/25/76, effective Winter 1977; Am. 1/27/81)
      (D) For a course extending over more than one term, where the evaluation of the student’s performance is deferred until the end of the final term, provisional grades of In Progress shall be assigned in the intervening terms. Subject to the provisions of Academic Senate Regulation 634, grade points and units for courses graded In Progress shall not be counted in calculating a student’s grade point average. Provisional grades shall be replaced by final grades if the student completes the full sequence. The student may receive final grades, grade points, and unit credit for completed terms when he or she has not completed the entire sequence if the instructor certifies that the course was not completed for good cause.
      (E) All grades except Incomplete or In Progress are final when filed by the instructor in the end-of-term course report. The correction of clerical and procedural errors shall be governed by guidelines established by the Davis Division and shall be under the supervision of the Davis Division Grade Changes Committee. No change of grade may be made on the basis of reassessment of the quality of a student’s work or, with the exception of Incomplete or In Progress grades, the completion of additional work. No term grade except Incomplete may be revised by re-examination. Students who believe that their failure to submit work subject to grading was due to circumstances beyond their control, resulting in a grade of F may petition the Grade Changes Committee for removal of the grade. (Am. 9/1/2012)
      (F) Repetition of courses not authorized by the Davis Division Committee on Courses of Instruction to be taken more than once for credit is subject to the following conditions.
      (1) An undergraduate student may repeat only those courses in which he or she received a grade of D, F, or Not Passed, as well as courses in which a grade of I has become permanent on the student’s record because the work was not completed within three years, as described in (C) above. Departments may restrict repetition of a course if it is a prerequisite to a course already completed with a grade of C- or better. Courses in which a grade of D or F has been earned may not be repeated on a Passed or Not Passed basis. (En. 4/21/80, Am. 3/11/81) (Am. 9/1/2010)
      (2) A graduate student, with the consent of the appropriate graduate adviser and the Dean of Graduate Studies, may repeat any course in which he or she received a grade of C, D, F or Unsatisfactory, as well as courses in which a grade of I has become permanent on the student’s record because the work was not completed within three years, as described in (C) above, up to a maximum of three courses for all courses repeated. Courses in which a grade of C, D, or F has been earned may not be repeated on a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory basis. (Am. 10/25/76, effective Winter 1977) (Am. 9/1/2010, 9/1/2011)
      (3) Repetition of a course more than once requires approval by the appropriate dean in all instances.
      (4) Degree credit for a course will be given only once, but the grade assigned at each enrollment shall be permanently recorded. (Am. by mail ballot 5/7/74)
      (5) In computing the grade point average of an undergraduate who repeats courses in which he or she received a grade of D or F, only the most recently earned grade for each course and corresponding grade points shall be used for the first 16 units repeated. In the case of further repetitions, the grade point average shall be based on all grades assigned and total units attempted.
      (6) In computing the grade point average of a graduate student who repeats courses in which he or she received a grade of C, D, or F, only the most recently earned grade for each course and corresponding grade points shall be used.
      (G) The Registrar shall enter the notation "NG" on the end-of-term course report and on the student’s record for a student whose instructor has not yet submitted an appropriate grade (letter grade or P, NP, S, U, I, or IP). The instructor must indicate in the "memorandum" column on the course report the reason for not submitting a grade. Conditions for removing the NG are: (Am. 9/1/2012)
      (1) The NG notation shall be replaced by the appropriate grade upon written submission of that grade by the instructor.
      (2) The NG and relevant course notation both shall be deleted from the student’s transcript if it is established that an administrative error resulted in improper assignment of NG to the student.
      (3) The Registrar shall change the NG notation to an F grade if the NG has not been removed under the provisions of (1) or (2), unless the instructor in charge indicates otherwise to the Registrar. To ensure that the student is aware that an NG must be removed, the Registrar shall provide the following written notification to all affected students: "NG must be removed within one term or the NG will be changed to a grade of F. If this course appeared on your midterm course check list, see your instructor immediately; if it did not appear, see the Registrar."
      A541. Uniform Grading Standards
        Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the same undergraduate course shall be graded using identical performance standards. These grading standards must reflect the expectations for performance of undergraduate students. (En. 6/5/84; Am. 3/6/85)
      542. Changing a Final Grade
        The student or an appropriate faculty member must submit a petition to the Davis Division Grade Changes Committee or, for professional faculty or students in professional courses in their own professional schools, to the grade change committee of that school. Approval or denial shall be governed by working guidelines that are consistent with the provisions of Davis Division Regulation A540.
      A545. Passed or Not Passed Grading
      (A) A regular undergraduate student in good standing may opt to take specific courses on a Passed (P) or Not Passed (NP) basis up to the limits specified in Davis Division Regulation A545(B). (Am. by mail ballot 5/7/74)
      (B) Not more than one-third of the units taken in residence on the Davis campus and presented for graduation by an undergraduate student may be in courses taken on a Passed or Not Passed basis, including courses graded in accordance with Davis Division Regulations A545(C) and A545(D). The faculty of any college or school on the Davis campus may establish regulations that are more restrictive regarding use of the Passed or Not Passed option by its students.
      (C) With approval of the appropriate department or division and of the appropriate committees on courses of instruction, the grades assigned by instructors in specific undergraduate courses may be, for undergraduate students, Passed or Not Passed only and, for graduate students, Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory only.
      (D) Each special study, directed group study, or other variable-unit undergraduate course shall be graded for undergraduate students on a Passed or Not Passed only basis and for graduate students on a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory only basis unless specific approval for the use of a letter grade is given by the appropriate committees on courses of instruction.
      (E) For courses being undertaken on a Passed or Not Passed basis, the grade of Passed shall be awarded only for work which otherwise would receive a grade of C- or better. Units thus earned shall be counted in satisfaction of degree requirements, but courses undertaken on a Passed or Not Passed basis shall be disregarded in determining a student’s grade point average.
      A546. Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory Grading
      (A) Under such rules as the Graduate Council and the appropriate program may determine, a graduate student in good standing is authorized to undertake, in addition to courses graded on a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory only basis, one course each term on an optional Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U) basis. After a graduate student has been advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student may undertake an unlimited number of courses on a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory basis.
      (B) With the consent of the appropriate program and approval of the Graduate Council and of the Davis Division Committee on Courses of Instruction, the grades assigned in specific graduate courses may be, for graduate students, Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory only and, for undergraduate students, Passed or Not Passed only.
      (C) Students enrolled in individual research or individual study graduate courses (299 or 299D) shall be graded on a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory only basis.
      (D) In courses being undertaken on a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory basis, the grade of Satisfactory shall be awarded only for work which otherwise would receive a grade of B- or better and shall be awarded in undergraduate courses only for work which otherwise would receive a grade of C- or better. Units thus earned shall be counted in satisfaction of degree requirements but disregarded in determining a student’s grade point average. No credit shall be allowed for work graded Unsatisfactory.
      REGISTRATION
      547. Adding or Dropping a Course
      (A) The deadline to drop a course is the twentieth day of instruction, except for courses that a department or program has noted in the Class Search Tool to have a ten-day drop deadline. The deadline to add a course is the twelfth day of instruction. Courses may be added or dropped at any time before these dates by any method mutually agreed upon by the Registrar and the Chair of the Davis Division of the Academic Senate. (Am. 5/27/93; Eff. 9/1/93; Am. 6/8/98; Eff. 9/1/99)
      (B) At any time after the add deadline and before the close of business on the last day of instruction for the term, or, for summer sessions (excluding special session) the close of business on the last day of instruction in the fifth week of the session, approval to add a course may be granted upon petition by the student and certification by the appropriate authority. Approval of such petitions may be granted only in cases where substantial evidence indicates that the student did attempt to add the course prior to the deadline, but was prevented from doing so by clerical error or other situation beyond the student’s control. The petition must be approved by the appropriate dean and, in addition, by the appropriate committee of the faculty of the student’s college or school or the appropriate subcommittee of the Graduate Council. The faculty committee may authorize an administrative officer to act on its behalf, but at least once each quarter the committee should receive and review a summary of the actions taken in its name. (Am. 9/1/2013)
      (C) At any time after the drop deadline and before the close of business on the last day of instruction for the term, or, for summer sessions (excluding special session) the close of business on the last day of instruction in the fifth week of the session, approval may be granted upon petition by the student and certification by an appropriate authority that, due to unexpected circumstances beyond the student’s control, one or more courses should be dropped. The circumstances may include illness, serious personal problems, an accident, a death in the immediate family, a large and necessary increase in working hours, or other situations deemed to be of equal gravity. The petition must be approved by the appropriate dean and, in addition, by the appropriate committee of the faculty of the student’s college or school or the appropriate subcommittee of the Graduate Council. The faculty committee may authorize an administrative officer to act on its behalf, but at least once each quarter the committee should receive and review a summary of the actions taken in its name. An undergraduate student is permitted to drop a course subsequent to the drop deadline even if doing so would reduce that student’s study list below 12 units, but such a student no longer can be certified as a full-time student. (Am. 9/1/2013)
      (D) To drop a course or withdraw from the University after close of business on the last day of instruction for the term, or, for summer sessions (excluding special session) the close of business on the last day of instruction in the fifth week of the session, the student or an appropriate faculty member must submit a petition to the Davis Division Grade Changes Committee or, for professional faculty or students in professional courses in their own professional schools, to the grade change committee of that school. Approval will be granted only in the most unusual circumstances and only in those cases where it is clear that by not approving the petition the student would be treated unfairly. (Am. 9/1/2013)
      549. Registration at Other UC Campuses
      (A) A UC student’s home campus must permit a student in good standing to enroll simultaneously in courses offered by the home campus and in course(s) offered by another UC campus. Similarly, a UC student’s home campus must also permit a student in good standing to enroll in summer courses offered by another UC campus. However, non-home campuses are not obliged to accept enrollment by students from other UC campuses. Each campus may set an upper limit on the total number of non-home campus enrollment units or courses its own student may apply toward graduation requirements.
      (B) In order to ensure that the units will count toward any requirements, including unit requirements, students in residence at their home campus must inform the home campus in writing before enrolling in a course offered by another UC campus. This may be accomplished by electronic or conventional means, according to the home campus’s procedures.
      (C) If the student wishes a course taken on a non-home UC campus to satisfy a breadth, major, or other specific requirement (other than unit credit), he or she is responsible for determining that an existing formal agreement establishes that the course will satisfy the requirement or for securing approval, in advance of registering, from the relevant academic unit on the home campus. If these requirements are not met, the home campus may refuse to allow the course to satisfy specific requirements (other than unit requirements).
      1) To the extent permitted by another UC campus, undergraduate students in good standing and registered for at least 6 units at UC Davis may enroll for any number of units in courses on another UC campus. If the student completes the UC Davis units, the other UC campus units will be counted as described below.
      2) Other UC campus quarter units apply at UC Davis in the quarter in which they are taken. Other UC campus semester units are split between the UC Davis quarters in which the course begins and ends.
      3) The units taken at other UC campuses apply to the 180 unit minimum for graduation. They also count as "in residence" for the purpose of the UC residency requirement that 35 of the last 45 units be "in residence." It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate in advance with his or her college and major department regarding how the off campus units can be applied to major and college requirements.
      4) The other UC campus courses will be listed with a course number and title on the student’s UC Davis transcript. They will be counted in the student’s UC GPA.
      5) Students should be informed about the financial aid implications of enrolling for fewer than 12 units on the UC Davis campus.
      6) After the first day of each quarter, registered students in good standing from other UC campuses may enroll at UC Davis, but registration priority shall be given to UC Davis students. (Rescinded 13 May 97; En 27 May 99; Am 28 Feb 01) (Am 28 Oct 04)
      ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
      550. Academic Dishonesty
      (A) Examinations in any course on the Davis campus may be monitored only when deemed necessary by the instructor.
      (B) A grade of "0" or "F" may be given for any examination or assignment submitted by a student to satisfy course requirements if cheating, plagiarism, or any form of academic dishonesty is admitted to have occurred, or is determined by proper adjudication to have occurred, in performance of the work. If the student admits or is determined after adjudication to have committed a violation of the Code of Academic Conduct which does not involve dishonesty, the faculty member may assign an appropriate grade penalty for the misconduct.
      (C) Any contested accusation of cheating, plagiarism, or other violation of the Code of Academic Conduct in an examination or assignment submitted by a student to satisfy course requirements shall be adjudicated by a faculty-student committee appointed by the Chief Campus Officer in consultation with the Davis Division Committee on Committees.
      (D) Whether admitted or not, any case in which the instructor has substantial suspicions of student misconduct should be reported by the instructor to the Office of Student Judicial Affairs. (Am. 3/13/95 and effective 9/1/95)
      HONORS
      551. Honors
        Davis Division minimum standards for Undergraduate Honors and Honors at Graduation are as follows:
      (A) Undergraduate Honors. Students named on the quarterly honors list by each college shall be those who have completed, for a letter grade, a minimum of 12 units in that quarter with a grade-point average equal to or higher than the minimum grade-point average attained by the upper 16 percent of students registered in the same class and college during that quarter. (Effective 6/6/79)
      (B) Honors at Graduation
         Honors at Graduation shall be awarded to students who have completed at least 45 units of work in the University with a grade-point average that places them in the appropriate top percentage of the graduating class in their college or school, as indicated in the following table. For the June graduating class, the percentages in the table shall be applied to the most recent grade report available (normally the winter quarter) to determine the cut-off grade-point averages for the different honors categories. Each of the three units-completed groups in the table is considered separately. All students who tie for last position in an honors category shall be awarded honors in that category.
      Total quarter Units Completed Highest High at UC Honors Honors Honors Total
      45-89Top 2% Next 2%Next 4%8%
      90-134 Top 3% Next 3% Next 6% 12%
      135+ Top 4% Next 4% Next 8% 16%
      The grade-point averages representing the cut-off points for the honors categories for the June graduating class shall be used as minimum criteria for awarding honors to students who graduate in a summer session or the fall or winter quarter, immediately following. (En. May, 1978; Effective Dec., 1982. A variance for the College of Letters and Science approved 10/31/88. See L&S Bylaw 89(A))
      (C) Honors Challenge
         The Davis Honors Challenge (DHC) shall be a four-year program that includes Honors seminars and culminates in an honors thesis. The DHC program shall be managed by a Director and an Honors Council, all of whom are appointed by the Vice Provost of Undergraduate Studies. Admission to the program is based on an essay and letters of recommendation that are evaluated by the Honors Council. The Undergraduate Council shall review the program at intervals no longer than five years.
      (D) Honors credit may be earned by satisfactorily completing either: 1) specifically designated Honors courses; or 2) ordinary courses augmented by either an Honors section or an Honors Contract. Honors courses, Honors course sections, and Honors contracts must be approved by the Honors Council, and by the normal college or school as well as Divisional reviewing agencies. Honors courses, sections and contracts shall be distinguished by the level of intellectual challenge involved, the exploration of connections, and the requirement to express verbally and in writing the critical thought that is the essence of intellectual and scholarly enterprise. Students enrolled in the Honors Challenge Program shall have the direction of a faculty mentor. (Renum. from Guideline 1, 11/19/84)
      EXPECTED AND MINIMUM PROGRESS
      A552. Expected and Minimum Progress
      (A) Expected Progress Defined. A full-time regular undergraduate student (see Davis Division Regulation C561 for definition of a part-time student) shall be considered to make expected progress with an average of 15 units passed per quarter. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (B) Minimum Progress Defined. A full-time, regular undergraduate student (see Davis Division Regulation C561 for definition of a part-time student) shall be required to maintain an average of at least 13 units passed over all quarters of enrollment. Minimum progress shall be defined as an average of 13 units passed per quarter calculated at the end of every spring quarter for the preceding three quarters (Fall, Winter, Spring) comprising an academic year. The average shall be calculated based on the number of quarters in which the student was enrolled full-time during that period. (En. 6/7/83; Am. 11/30/83; Am 6/8/99; Eff. 9/1/2000; Am 05/04/05)
      (1) Units Passed.
      (a) For the purposes of calculating minimum progress, remedial non-credit courses shall be evaluated according to the “Carnegie Unit” rule and counted as units passed, subject to prior approval of such courses for this purpose by the Davis Division Committee on Courses of Instruction. The unit values associated with such courses shall not be applied toward the satisfaction of any baccalaureate degree requirement. (Am. 2/9/77; Am. 05/04/05)
      (b) If a student receives a grade of D in a course and repeats the course, the course shall be counted as units passed each time the course is passed up to a maximum of 16 units. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (c) Units passed during a summer session at UCD or at another accredited school and transferred to UCD shall be counted as units passed during the first full-time quarter of enrollment at UCD immediately following the summer session. (Am.05/04/05)
      (d) Units passed by examination in accordance with policies established by the Davis Division Committee on Courses of Instruction (see SR 620 and DDR 528) shall be counted as units passed during the term in which the examination was taken. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (e) Units graded as IP (in progress) shall be counted as units passed. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (f) Units graded I are not counted as units passed. When the grade I is replaced by a passing grade, the units shall be counted toward minimum progress for the quarter in which the I grade was awarded. (Am. 6/7/83; En. 11/30/83;Am. 05/04/05)
      (C) Failure to Make Minimum Progress. (Renum. 6/8/87)
      (1) In accordance with the provisions of Davis Division Regulation A552(B), at the end of every Spring quarter it shall be determined if each student enrolled full-time for any quarter during the preceding academic year has met the minimum progress requirement of an average of 13 units passed per quarter. A student whose average number of units passed is less than 13 but greater than or equal to 12 shall be placed on “academic probation for quantitative reasons.” A student whose average number of units passed is less than 12 shall be “subject to academic disqualification for quantitative reasons.” An undergraduate student is in scholastic good standing if not on academic probation or subject to disqualification for either qualitative reasons as defined in Senate Regulation 900(A) or quantitative (minimum progress) reasons as defined herein. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (2) For every student who is “subject to academic disqualification for quantitative reasons,” a “degree progress average” shall be calculated at the close of the next full-time quarter of enrollment at UCD. The degree progress average is defined as the quotient of the number of units passed during full-time quarters from the initial quarter of matriculation at UCD divided by the number of full-time quarters completed at UCD. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (3) A student whose degree progress average is less than 13 units shall be “subject to academic disqualification for quantitative reasons.” A student whose degree progress average is 13 or more units shall not be “subject to academic disqualification for quantitative reasons.” (Am. 05/04/05)
      (4) Student Notification:
          A student “subject to disqualification for quantitative reasons” for two consecutive, full-time quarters shall be disqualified from the university. That action shall be taken by the College faculty (or its authorized agent) and is subject to such conditions as the faculty may impose. Exceptions to disqualification for quantitative reasons may be granted by the college faculty (or its authorized agent) in appropriate circumstances under policies adopted by the college faculty. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (5) An undergraduate student in scholastic good standing for qualitative reasons as defined in Senate Regulation 900(A) but who is subject to academic probation or disqualification for quantitative (progress) reasons as defined herein, may continue to opt to take courses on a Pass or Not Passed basis (See Davis Division Regulation A545(A)). (Am. 05/04/05)
      (6) Colleges shall report the numbers of students subject to disqualification for quantitative reasons and the number of exceptions and reasons for those exceptions to the Undergraduate Council on an annual basis in the fall quarter. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (7) A notation on a full-time student’s transcript that he or she either has not made minimum progress or is on probation or subject to disqualification for failure to make minimum progress shall be removed when the student has satisfied all other requirements for graduation. (Am. 05/04/05)
      Except when a student has been disqualified from the university, all notations regarding failure to comply with the minimum progress requirement shall be redacted when copies of a student’s transcript are prepared for outside persons or agencies, such as professional or graduate schools. (Am. 05/04/05)
      (D) Accommodations for Students with Documented Disabilities (Am. 4/14/2008)
      (1) A student seeking an accommodation for a documented disability with respect to the minimum progress requirement shall provide his or her Dean’s office with a letter from the campus Student Disability Center (SDC) including a recommendation for either a transfer to part-time status or a waiver of the minimum progress requirement for full-time students (for a specific period not to exceed one year). It is the student’s responsibility to request accommodations as soon as possible, and this notification must be made within a period of time which allows the university a reasonable opportunity to evaluate the request and offer necessary adjustments. The accommodation is subject to extension and modification, and it is the student’s responsibility to submit subsequent requests as the need arises. (Am. 4/14/2008)
      (2) The faculty of a college (or its authorized agent) may authorize either a transfer to parttime status (as described in Davis Division Regulations C560-C562) or a waiver of the minimum progress requirement for specific quarters (not to extend to quarters beyond those recommended by the SDC) for a student for whom the SDC has determined that an accommodation is required. In either case the units earned and the quarters attended during the period of the accommodation shall not be used in determining whether a student has satisfied the minimum progress requirement. No accommodation shall alter the nature of the academic demands made of the student nor decrease the standards and types of academic performance. (Am. 4/14/2008)
      (3) If the faculty (or its authorized agent) and the SDC cannot arrive at a mutually agreeable accommodation, the matter shall be resolved by a committee convened the Vice Chancellor - Student Affairs that includes a representative from the SDC and the authorized agent of the faculty of the college (or, in the absence of such agent, the chair of the faculty). (Am. 4/14/2008)
      (4) Colleges shall report to the Undergraduate Council on an annual basis in the fall quarter the numbers, types, and duration of accommodations granted. (Am. 4/14/2008)
      CREDIT FOR COURSES
      A553. Credit for Courses Taken at Other Institutions
      (A) Students are prohibited from obtaining transfer credit for courses taken at a non-University of California campus in a quarter during which the student is enrolled as a full-time student at Davis. Variances to this Regulation may only be obtained via petition to the appropriate college committee or administrative officer prior to enrollment.
      (B) In those instances in which a variance has been granted, units earned from courses taken at a non-University of California campus shall be counted toward minimum progress in the quarter(s) in which the dual enrollment occurred.
      (C) Summer session course work is exempt from the restrictions described in Paragraph (A). (En. 4/25/83)
      554. Credit for Concurrent Courses
        Senate Regulation 800(C) defines concurrent courses as those in which both matriculated resident (regular status) students and University Extension students are enrolled and in which resident students receive grade-point and degree credit. Enrollment in such Extension courses offered on the Davis campus shall be denoted by the designator “XDC” on University transcripts and be accepted for university unit, subject and grade-point credit upon a student’s subsequent admission or readmission to regular student status in accordance with the following conditions. (En. 05/07/03) (Am. 9/1/2014)
      (A) Students on leave of absence and regular status students when matriculated, or regular status students for a period of one calendar year following the last term of regular enrollment may not enroll in concurrent courses. Exceptions to this policy for undergraduate students may be made under extraordinary circumstances by petition with the prior approval of the Dean of the appropriate college and the Dean of University Extension, or their designees. Graduate students requesting exception to this policy must obtain the prior consent of the Dean of the Graduate Division in addition to the Dean of University Extension.
      (B) Concurrent Extension courses do not count toward satisfaction of the University residence requirement (SR 630) or the residence requirements specified by the Davis Division, the student’s college or, in the case of a graduate student, the Graduate Council.
      (C) Students enrolled in concurrent Extension courses are subject to the same Academic Senate and Davis Division regulations and guidelines concerning enrollment and grading as regular status students in the corresponding courses.
      (D) Concurrent Extension courses may constitute at most half of the units offered in satisfaction of the upper division requirements of the major.
      (E) Regulations permitting further restrictions on the number of units of concurrent Extension course work that may be applied to undergraduate degree programs shall be established only by the faculty of the appropriate college or, in the case of graduate degree programs, only by the faculty of the appropriate Graduate Program and authorized by the Graduate Council. In such instances, the allowable number of units of concurrent course work will be determined chronologically, starting with the course completed first. Grade point credit for the concurrent courses shall be determined in the same manner.
      PROGRAM REVIEW
      556. Undergraduate Program Review
        Each undergraduate teaching program (and/or major) on the Davis campus shall be reviewed and evaluated by a committee of its parent school or college at intervals not exceeding seven years. The criteria for said reviews shall be established by the Davis Division Undergraduate Council and disseminated widely so that they will be commonly understood. The reports of reviewing committees shall be forwarded to the Divisional Undergraduate Council for consideration or action as it sees fit. (En. 5/28/74; Am. 4/27/76)
      RESIDENCE AND PART-TIME STUDY
      C560. Degree Programs
        Degree programs in the University may be open to part-time students whenever there are good educational reasons for so doing. No majors or other degree programs will be offered only for part-time students, except as specifically authorized by the Academic Senate.
      C561. Part-Time Students
        A part-time student shall be defined as follows:
      A part-time undergraduate student is one who is approved to enroll for ten units or fewer, or an equivalent number of courses, per quarter.
      A part-time graduate student is one who is approved to enroll for one-half or less of the regular course load stipulated in Academic Senate Regulation 702, or as otherwise defined by the campus Academic Senate.
      The same admissions standards that apply to full-time students will apply to part-time students. Approval for individual students to enroll on a part-time basis will be given for reasons of occupation, family responsibilities, health, or for one time only graduating senior status. Approval to enroll as a part-time undergraduate student shall be given by the appropriate dean; approval to enroll as a part-time graduate student shall be given by the appropriate dean, after recommendation by the department or program. (Am. 10/30/89)
      C562. Minimum Progress and Normative Time
        Residence in any regular term is validated for a part-time student on the Davis campus by a program of one or more courses. Part-time undergraduate students shall not be required to meet minimum progress requirements. Prior to candidacy, part-time graduate students will acquire time to the degree under the Normative Time to Degree Policy at one-half the rate of full-time students for those quarters during which they are approved for part-time study. After advancement to candidacy, all graduate students shall be considered full-time under the Normative Time policy. (En. 11/21/83)
      610. Residence in a Term
        Residence in any regular term is validated by a program of courses or other exercises approved by the Faculty of a student's college or school. For undergraduates this shall be at least six units of resident courses of instruction. Graduate students validate residence with programs of instruction or research approved by the appropriate Graduate Council. [See SR 688-690.] (EC 15 Apr 74) (Am 9 Mar 83; Am 6 Mar 85) (Am 28 Oct. 04)

      All modifications of existing legislation and all newly enacted legislation shall become effective on the first day of September following approval, unless another effective date is accepted by a majority vote of the members present.